Jane & Marcel Dieulafoy

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Oil & Collage on Gesso Board

h: 56 w: 65 d: 3 (cms).

From the ‘No Man’s Land’ Series:

The title of this series of paintings ‘No Man’s Land’ relates to those who have challenged the social system of patriarchy in order to live adventurous or professional lives of discovery. The aim is to produce a portrait gallery of the hidden contributors to history - a gallery of little known protagonists who have studied, achieved and explored despite the perceived social unacceptabilty of their sex or sexuality for their chosen endeavours, and to celebrate those to whom the ‘doing’ was of greater importance than the need for personal recognition.

Jane Dieulafoy (1851 –1916) was a French archaeologist, explorer, novelist and journalist. Together with her husband Marcel-Auguste Dieulafoy, she is known for her excavations at Susa. For her contributions to archaeology, the French government conferred upon her the title of Chevalier of the Legion of Honor in 1886.

£1600

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Emily Hahn

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Oil & Collage on Gesso Board

h: 44 w: 54 d: 3 (cms).

Emily Hahn 1905 – 1997: was an American journalist and author. Considered an early feminist and called "a forgotten American literary treasure" by The New Yorker magazine, she was the author of 54 books and more than 200 articles and short stories. Her novels in the 20th century played a significant role in opening up Asia and Africa to the west. Her extensive travels throughout her life and her love of animals influenced much of her writing. After living in Florence and London in the mid-1920s, she traveled to the Belgian Congo and hiked across Central Africa in the 1930s. In 1935 she traveled to Shanghai, where she taught English for three years and became involved with prominent figures, such as The Soong Sisters and the Chinese poet, Zau Sinmay.

In 1924, prior to graduating from mining engineering school, she traveled 2,400 miles across the United States in a Model T-Ford dressed as a man with her friend, Dorothy Raper. During her drive across New Mexico, she wrote about her travel experiences to her brother-in-law, who, unbeknownst to her, forwarded the letters she wrote to The New Yorker. This jump-started her early career as a writer. Hahn wrote for The New Yorker from 1929 to 1996.

£1350

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